Temperatures to drop; snow by the end of the week

Stefan Hard / Staff PhotoTwo friends walk past the First Congregational Church in Randolph Center as heavy fog Sunday envelops higher elevations with a January thaw in full swing.

Stefan Hard / Staff Photo
Two friends walk past the First Congregational Church in Randolph Center as heavy fog Sunday envelops higher elevations with a January thaw in full swing.

The grass is showing in patches on the lawn, and the driveway slush is deep – we’ll need to shovel that off to the side before it freezes or we’ll have a rough and bumpy – and slippery road. The ice dams that had been trapped at the gutters broke apart and fell to the ground over the weekend – dangerous icefalls.

However, it’s looking like winter is on her way back to Vermont. We’ll be seeing temperatures dropping day by day, with potential for some snow squalls – although no real storm – by Thursday or Friday.

The forecast for today:

Showers likely to start, may change to isolated flurries over ridgelines by midday as they end. Becoming mostly sunny during the PM. Morning highs 40-45. W-SW wind 5-15 mph shifting to WNW 10-15 mph.

Tonight: Mostly clear. Lows 20-25. Wind diminishing to light and variable.
Tuesday: Mostly sunny. Cooler. Highs 33-38. Light, variable wind.
Tuesday Nt: Partly cloudy. Lows 20-25.
Wednesday: Partly cloudy. Highs 34-38.
Wednesday Nt: Variable clouds. A slight chance for snow showers to develop. Lows 23-28.
Thursday: Early clouds and scattered snow showers, then partly cloudy, breezy, turning colder. AM highs 33-38.
Thursday Nt: Partly cloudy; scattered flurries over and west of the Greens. Much colder. Lows 5-15.
Friday: Partly sunny, scattered mountain flurries. Highs 20-30 from along RT 4 to the Massachusetts border.

Forecast Discussion from the Fairbanks Museum in St. Johnsbury:
A cold front bisecting the state to start the day will continue eastward this morning, and colder, drier air will infiltrate the region on a gentle but persistent west to northwest breeze. HIGH pressure now centered over Kansas will elongate to the northeast during the next 48 hours to give us generally quiet and incrementally colder conditions day by day.  Meanwhile, the northern branch of the polar jet stream is strengthening once again as the polar vortex reforms over northern Hudson Bay. Disturbances rotating around this vortex will approach us later Wednesday, and help drive an arctic front through the region later Wednesday night into early Thursday. That front will be accompanied by snow showers and perhaps a few snow squalls.

Leave a Reply