Storm arrives…slowly

Vyto Starinskas / Staff Photo  Aaron Farrar picks up a stack of shovels at Aubuchon Hardware in Ludlow and puts them on his plow truck and sander before on Thursday, before the upcoming storm.

Vyto Starinskas / Staff Photo
Aaron Farrar picks up a stack of shovels at Aubuchon Hardware in Ludlow and puts them on his plow truck and sander before on Thursday, before the upcoming storm.

So far, there’s not much snow here at 6 a.m. There are reports of snow falling in the north, Montpelier and Morrisville, to be specific, but it’s barely a trace so far here in southwestern Vermont. This storm, called “Nemo” by the Weather Channel, has been hyped pretty hard by the weather-media complex. Turn to the Weather Channel web site yesterday and the headline was one word: “Devastation”. There was massive traffic around Boston.  All this before a single snowflake fell.

We have a many school closings in Vermont, mostly in the south. Almost every school in Vermont is closed, along with many other offices and government functions.

Today the forecast is, you guessed it, snow, moderate to heavy at times; accumulations 3 to 5 inches north, 4 to 6 inches south. Highs 21-25. Southeast winds 5 to 15 mph.

Tonight: Snow continuing; additional accumulations 3 to 7 inches north, 4 to 8 inches south. Lows 8 to 12 above. Northeast winds 10 to 20 mph,
gusting to 30 mph.

Tomorrow: Snow showers in the morning, then becoming partly cloudy. Highs 17 to 21.

Extended Forecast:
Saturday Night: Mainly clear. Lows around 7 below.
Sunday: Mostly sunny. Highs around 25.
Sunday Night: Mainly clear. Lows 6 to 10 above.
Monday: Becoming mostly cloudy. A good chance of snow, possibly mixing with or changing to rain. Highs 33 to 37.
Monday Night: Mostly cloudy with scattered snow showers. Lows around 25.
Tuesday: Mostly cloudy. A chance of snow or rain showers. Highs around 35.

Forecast Discussion:
Today the forecast area is wedged tightly between strong high pressure to the north and developing low pressure to the south. The lower pressure that’s involved currently consists of two separate surface lows, one near Lake
Erie and the other along the mid-Atlantic coast; the two will likely merge along the coast later today. Once the two storms consolidate, an intense coastal storm will develop off the southern New England coast. As a result, a significant winter storm is expected over our area, with snow intensifying later this afternoon and into the evening, and then continuing through the night, before tapering off tomorrow morning. Overall snow amounts are likely to vary widely, generally through the 6 to 12 inch range. In terms of location, the greater amounts are likely to be in  southern and eastern sections of the forecast area. In terms of elevation, the greater amounts are likely to occur in the mountains, with lesser amounts in the valleys. In the wake of this storm, strong high pressure will build in from the west and bring placid but cold conditions for the weekend, beyond Saturday morning.

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