Cold today, but sun expected

Jeb Wallace-Brodeur / Staff  Photo                           Rebecca Copans of Montpelier and her daughter, Lucy, 2, take a run down the Hubbard Park sledding hill on Thursday morning after a brief snow squall moved through the area.

Jeb Wallace-Brodeur / Staff Photo
Rebecca Copans of Montpelier and her daughter, Lucy, 2, take a run down the Hubbard Park sledding hill on Thursday morning after a brief snow squall moved through the area.

For the snow sports enthusiasts, the first days of this week meant a bit of a relief – the snow wasn’t going away altogether, but the thaw sure put a dent in our base. There’s not much more snow in the forecast, except for some possibilities over the weekend, but the cold is here for a good stretch, so we should avoid more melting for a little while anyway.

Today we can expect mostly sunny with highs in the teens; tonight the clouds will move in and lows will dip into the single digits or below zero in some locations. Saturday, mostly cloudy with a high in the 30s; Sunday mostly cloudy with scattered snow showers and high around freezing. Sunday night it will get cold again, with lows around 5 degrees, and for Monday and Tuesday, we’ll probably see highs in the teens with clouds.

Forecast discussion from the Fairbanks Museum in St. Johnsbury:
After a very cold night last night, temperatures will remain on the unseasonably cold side today, despite mostly sunny conditions. Temperatures will drop off a bit early tonight before rising later on because of an approaching warm front. Even if the front doesn’t reach us by daybreak, clouds ahead of it will and that will help the temperatures start to rise after midnight. A few snow showers will be possible, in association with this warm front, late tonight and early tomorrow. Gusty southwest winds behind the front will moderate temperatures considerable, but it might not seem much warmer due to the wind chill.

A few periods of snow showers will be possible on Saturday night and into Sunday because of a vigorous surface cyclone that will be gathering strength over the St. Lawrence and Ottawa valleys. The vigor of this storm is more likely to be expressed in term of wind than in terms of precipitation, as atmospheric moisture will be a bit lacking, and the strongest dynamics are more likely to occur north of the international border.

An even more prolonged arctic outbreak will move in behind this storm on Sunday afternoon, and through the middle portions of next week.

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